Five surprising things about China

China

The look: brown miniature poodle

The sound: Lady Gaga’s Joanne

The smell: Misc. Asian city

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Work it


1. I actually loved it.

I was not really looking forward to this trip, or China specifically. I hadn’t heard the best of things. I read even worse things. I stepped into this country with zero to negative expectations. Boy, was I incorrect — it’s amazing! Maybe low expectations are what made it so great.

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The Bund — it’s less polluted then I thought!

Shanghai is my favorite city so far. It has a unique and charismatic — in the words of Cesar Millan — energy that I fell in love with. A metropolis city full of good food and expensive coffee, I can see why people call it the New York City of Asia.

Noodles for me

Loaded with MSG

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I was applauded getting this photo taken.

The police: handsome and helpful. They made my heart skip a beat and not because I was scared. They were always willing to give directions in exchange for a picture. I don’t know if they have a Chinese version of Cops, but if they did, I would hoard episodes on my nonexistent DVR.

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2. The face of China is a brown mini poodle.

Well groomed and fed, these pups were everywhere. I didn’t see too many strays and the dogs seemed *actually* trained  (cough Korea). Talk about a cute trend!

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3. Disneyland is high tech.

Both a look to the future and one of the best days of my life, Shanghai Disneyland brought the magic. And at a cheaper price! I don’t think I can go back to the one in California because this one was SO. GOOD.

Though the most yelp rave about the ride Tron, and I agree that ride is amazing, the real magic was Pirates of the Caribbean. I have no idea which of the movies this ride was based on, but it doesn’t matter. The ride left my mouth agape.

We broke the day up by watching the production of The Lion King. It was exactly the same as when I saw it in New York and LA — except in Mandarin.

This day was essentially perfect and I learned a valuable lesson: always bring my passport.

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4. Seeing is believing: the air in Beijing.

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The Forbidden City

My first impression of Beijing was that I liked Shanghai better. I stand by it, but Bejing is so oooooooold, I have to appreciate it. For the amount of history it has, Bejing is a small city. It still is difficult to wrap my head around, especially Tiananmen Square. Although I walked past it several times, I couldn’t convince myself to take pictures. I had goosebumps. I guess my history teachers in high school were excellent because I could sense the secondary trauma looming in the air.

OR was it just pollution? Either way, the air was thick.


5. There are literally dead bodies in the Great Wall.

“You are better than the cable car people.”

Our tour of the Great Wall came with a complimentary lunch and pep talk. In some of the renovated area of the wall, they built a cable car for the convenience and to cater to lazy tourists. We were better than those people.

The guide was probably five feet tall. He had a buzz cut, a faded tattoo on his left hand, and a lot of experience climbing the Great Wall. He told us tales of how it took over 3,000 years and millions of people to build it. Each time someone died, they would build over their bodies making their corpse a part of the wall (OMG!!!).

When they say climbing, they mean it. The Great Wall winds up and down a mountainous landscape with stairs of varying depth and dimension. Sometimes there were no stairs at all. It was designed for people to eat it (ie Mongols attacking #GenghisKhan). I was weary, but I did it. Our group was there for three hours taking selfies — er, I mean climbing the Great Wall…

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Meditating on the potential remains of a PERSON.


I thought I would go to China a second time out of mere obligation for such an expensive visa. However, it is a beautiful and historic place that I can’t wait to visit again!